Chinese

Shanghai Rice Cake With Minced Pork & Leeks


Chinese white rice cake, Shanghai rice cake or pak kor meen… they mean the same thing. I didn’t really fancy eating pak kor meen when I was young because it was usually very chewy and difficult to swallow. However recently my dad help me rediscovered this childhood food again. Since then my memory of pak kor meen has been changed. It’s now lips licking & saliva dripping good! Haha

Chinese Rice Cake With Minced Pork & Leeks
This is heaven!

This is how my dad cook pak kor meen…

Chinese Rice Cake
Chinese rice cake. It’s about RM3.50.

Boil Rice Cake
In a pot, fill water until it covers the rice cake. Let it boil in medium heat and then simmer for 35-50 minutes depending on the doneness (al dente/chewy/soft). To check for doneness, try a small piece or pierce rice cake with a fork. Remember to stir occasionally to prevent rice cake from sticking to each other and the pot.

Once you get the right texture, drain the water and add cold tap water to stop the cooking. Put aside. Another method is to soak rice cake in water the night before. However my dad prefer boiling it on the same day of cooking.

Now slice garlic, shallots and finely chop soaked dried shrimps.

Trim And Rinse Leeks
Next trim and wash leeks.

Slice Leeks
Slice side way.

Marinate Minced Pork
Next marinate minced pork with oyster sauce, sesame oil, Shaoxing wine, tapioca flour and pepper. Put aside.

Now let’s start cooking.

Stir Fry Garlic, Shallots & Dried Shrimp
In a wok, add oil in high heat. Mix in garlic, shallots and dried shrimps and cook until fragrant.

Add Minced Pork & Oyster Sauce
Now turn knob to medium heat and add in marinated minced pork and oyster sauce. Stir fry until minced pork is nearly cooked. Then add prawns (optional) and leeks. Stir well.

Add Prawn, Leek & Rice Cake
Finally add rice cake and dark soy sauce. Make sure you mix ’em thoroughly.

Cooking Rice Cake
Add water and turn knob to high heat. Let the mixture boil. You can check for the doneness of the rice cake again. Lastly add salt to taste. That’s it. Serve immediately.

Chinese Rice Cake With Minced Pork & Leeks
I like my rice cake to be soft. Not overly soft. Just the right softness that you can still feel a lil’ bit of chewiness. Minced pork and some dried shrimps clinging to the rice cake as you bite into one = perfect Mmmmm… Leeks add some sweetness to the dish.

Ohh I will salivate just by thinking about this dish! Haha 🙂

Chinese Rice Cake With Minced Pork & Leeks
Serves 3-4

500g white rice cake,
150g marinated minced pork
3-4 leeks, washed and sliced
1 tablespoon dried shrimp, soaked and finely chopped
80g medium prawn (optional)
3 shallots, roughly chopped
3 cloves garlic, roughly chopped
1 tablespoon oyster sauce
3 tablespoons dark soy sauce
3-4 tablespoons oil
salt (to taste)
water (depends how liquidy you like; we add 3-4 cups water)

Marinate for minced pork
150g minced pork
1 teaspoon oyster sauce
1/2 teaspoon Shaoxing wine
1 teaspoon tapioca flour (you can sub with corn flour)
few dash of sesame oil
few dash of pepper

Method:
1. In a pot, fill water until it covers the rice cake. Boil in medium heat and then simmer for 35-50 minutes depending on the doneness you favour. To check for doneness, try a small piece or pierce rice cake with a fork. Stir occasionally to prevent rice cake from sticking to each other and the pot.

2. Once done, drain the water and add cold tap water to stop the cooking. Let the water remain in the pot while you prepare other ingredients.

3. Marinate minced pork and put aside.

4. Put oil in wok, then add garlic, shallots and dried shrimps. Cook in high heat until fragrant.

5. In medium heat, add minced pork and oyster sauce. Stir fry until minced pork is nearly cooked.

6. Next add prawns (optional) and leeks. Stir well.

7. Then, add rice cake and dark soy sauce. Mix well.

8. Now mix in some water, turn knob to high heat and let it boil. You can check for the doneness of the rice cake again.

Note: Liquid will dry up later, so make sure you put enough water if you like liquidy rice cake.

9. Lastly add salt to taste. Serve at once.

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12 Comments

  • Reply smallkucing October 19, 2011 at 1:47 pm

    oooo its call shanghai rice cake. Ordered in restaurant before. Only know its chinese name Pak kor

    • Reply Che-Cheh October 20, 2011 at 10:34 am

      I only learned the name Shanghai rice cake when I was writing this post. For me the familiar name is ‘pek ke’ in Hokkien.

  • Reply Nava Krishnan October 19, 2011 at 4:46 pm

    This rice cakes are new to me and have not used before but sure its such a lovely outcome the way the recipe was prepared.

    • Reply Che-Cheh October 20, 2011 at 10:39 am

      Ohh then you must try it. You can easily get it at Chinese sundry shop.

  • Reply Dawn October 20, 2011 at 1:42 am

    oh that’s what it’s called. remember eating them but don’t fancy it…eat them becoz it was on the table!

    • Reply Che-Cheh October 20, 2011 at 10:40 am

      Maybe coz you didn’t like the rice cake texture. If you cook the right texture, I’m sure you will love it. Really!

  • Reply foongpc October 26, 2011 at 1:27 am

    Hey I haven’t eaten pak kor meen before! I don’t see any restaurants selling it?

    • Reply Che-Cheh October 26, 2011 at 8:37 pm

      Ya I haven’t seen any restaurants serving this dish also. Buy a packet and ask your mom/sis to cook for you. 🙂

  • Reply KY January 17, 2014 at 4:05 pm

    May I know where to buy this dry white rice cake? Thanks 🙂

    • Reply Che-Cheh January 17, 2014 at 6:58 pm

      Hi KY, I bought it from Chinese mini mart. You can also find these at Chinese pasar malam vendors. Worst case, you can substitute this with Korean rice cake (the one they make tteokbokki) but in this similar shape.

  • Reply Maya June 9, 2014 at 4:13 pm

    Hey,

    is 白粿 the same as 耳块?

    Love your blog, just found it today 🙂

    Maya

    • Reply Che-Cheh June 9, 2014 at 8:24 pm

      Hi Maya, so sorry. I’m afraid I cannot be of any help. I don’t know how to read Chinese characters. Only know very few easy ones. And I’m Chinese. LOL

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